Electron Affinity-

  1. Unlike ionization energies, which are always positive for a neutral atom because energy is required to remove an electron, electron affinities can be negative (energy is released when an electron is added), positive (energy must be added to the system to produce an anion), or zero (the process is energetically neutral)
  2. The chlorine atom has the most negative electron affinity of any element, which means that more energy is released when an electron is added to a gaseous chlorine atom than to an atom of any other element:
  3. In contrast, the second electron affinity is always positive because the increased electron–electron repulsions in a dianion are far greater than the attraction of the nucleus for the extra electrons. For example, the first electron affinity of oxygen is −141 kJ/mol, but the second electron affinity is +744 kJ/mol:
  4. Thus the formation of a gaseous oxide ion is energetically quite unfavorable. Similarly, the formation of all common dianions or trianions is energetically unfavorable in the gas phase.
  5. If energy is required to form both positively charged ions and monatomic polyanions, why do ionic compounds such as MgO,Na2S, and Na3P form at all? The key factor in the formation of stable ionic compounds is the favorable electrostatic interactions between the cations and the anions in the crystalline salt.
  6. The chlorine atom has the most negative electron affinity of any element, which means that more energy is released when an electron is added to a gaseous chlorine atom than to an atom of any other element:

  7. Apparently, the increased electron–electron repulsions experienced by electrons confined to the relatively small 2p orbitals overcome the increased electron–nucleus attraction at short nuclear distances. Fluorine, therefore, has a lower affinity for an added electron than does chlorine. Consequently, the elements of the third row (n = 3) have the most negative electron affinities.
  8. Farther down a column, the attraction for an added electron decreases because the electron is entering an orbital more distant from the nucleus. Electron–electron repulsions also decrease because the valence electrons occupy a greater volume of space. These effects tend to cancel one another, so the changes in electron affinity within a family are much smaller than the changes in ionization energy
  9. Elements that do not form stable ions, such as the noble gases, are assigned an effective electron affinity that is greater than or equal to zero.
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